If It Wasn’t For You

By Ryan Nickerson

Sometimes people come into our lives who are tremendously important to us, but we never have a chance to properly thank them.

At a recruiting event for his high school, Principal Crook recognized a familiar face. It was his time to say thank you.

Dr. Dameion J. Crook is the principal of the Young Men’s Preparatory Academy in fifth-ward. A proud TSU alumni, Crook is also the Graduate/Off-campus Advisor for the Beta Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

“Ms. Deborah?” Crook said approaching the familiar face. “You may not remember me, but I was a student at TSU.”

Deborah Lewis, referred to as Ms. Deborah, was enrolling her great nephew in school.

“You probably don’t remember me,” Crook mentioned “but you used to let me go and eat in the cafeteria. For free.”

When Dr. Crook was an undergrad at TSU in the 90s, he lived off campus, where life often became financially difficult.

Ms. Deborah said she thinks she remembers him, but she still works here at TSU and has seen thousands of faces throughout the years.

“If it wasn’t for you, I probably would have starved. I probably would have never been able to graduate.” Crook told Ms. Debra at the recruiting event.

Over 20 years has passed since Dr. Crook attended TSU as an undergraduate. For the last 17, Crook spent his time as an educator here in Houston. Active in his community, Crook serves as a Board Member and Educational Chair for the Houston Chapter of 100 Black Men as well as a Scout Leader for the Boy Scouts. He is also an active member of the Houston Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., the American Leadership Forum and several other professional and community based organizations.

Throughout his success, he has not forgotten the little pieces of generosity and kindness that the TSU faculty is known to give.

When Dr. Crook told her that he is now the principal of the school her great nephew was trying to enroll at, Ms. Deborah was blown away. TSU is famous for putting the welfare of their students before anything else, and now that the roles are reversed, Dr. Crook has a chance to repay the generosity.

“This is my school Ms. Deborah. You helped build this. If I didn’t finish school, this would have never happened.”

Dr. Crook allowed Ms. Deborah and her nephew to skip the enrollment line, and gave them a personal tour of the school. The whole time Ms. Deborah kept emphasizing how proud she was of Dr. Crook.

Dr. Crook, conscious of the full gravity of how much she helped him through college and how she helped him shape the man he is today, gave the tour with a smile.

At a recruiting event for his high school, Dr. Dameion J. Crook knew the woman in the corner looked familiar. As he was starring, it hit him: if it wasn’t for that woman, he wouldn’t be where he is today.

“Ms. Deborah?” Dr. Crook said when he approached her. “You may not remember me, but I was a student at TSU.”

Dr. Crook is the principal of the Young Men’s Preparatory Academy in 5th ward, a proud TSU alumni, and is the Graduate/Off-campus Advisor for the Beta Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Deborah Lewis, referred to as Ms. Deborah, was enrolling her great nephew at his school.

When Dr. Crook was an undergrad at TSU in the 90s, he lived off campus, where life often became financially difficult.

“You probably don’t remember me” he said, “but you used to let me go and eat in the cafeteria. For free.”

Ms. Deborah said she thinks she remembers him, but she still works here at TSU and has seen thousands of faces throughout the years.

“If it wasn’t for you, I probably would have starved. I probably would have never been able to graduate.”

Over twenty years have passed since Dr. Crook attended TSU as an undergrad. Throughout his success, he has not forgotten the little pieces of generosity and kindness that the TSU faculty is known to give.

When Dr. Crook told her that he is now the principal of the school her great nephew is trying to enroll at, Ms. Deborah was blown away. TSU is famous for putting the welfare of their students before anything else, and now that the roles are reversed, Dr. Crook has a chance to repay the generosity.

“This is my school Ms. Deborah. You helped build this. If I didn’t finish school, this would have never happened.”

Dr. Crook allowed Ms. Deborah and her nephew to skip the enrollment line, and gave them a personal tour of the school. The whole time Ms. Deborah kept emphasizing how proud she is of Dr. Crook, but Dr. Crook knew the full gravity of how much she helped him through college and how she helped him shape the man he is today.

Author: Herald Staff